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Boeing Set to Ship First 737 Max to China in Years

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Skift Take

The supply is a lift for the beleaguered Boeing 737 Max, which has come below scrutiny since a door plug blew off an Alaska Airways jet.

Boeing is slated to ship a 737 Max to a Chinese language airline for the primary time since March 2019, in line with Bloomberg.

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Knowledge from FlightRadar24 exhibits that the 737 Max for China Southern Airways was scheduled to depart Boeing Subject in Seattle at 9:10 a.m. PT for Honolulu earlier than it reaches China. The airplane, a Max 8, departed from Boeing Subject at 11:55 a.m. PT, in line with FlightRadar24.

The supply marks an finish to the years-long freeze on 737 Max imports to Chinese language carriers amid political tensions between the U.S. and China. Boeing had beforehand raised its demand outlook for China — one of many fastest-growing aerospace markets — in September, citing financial progress and demand for home journey, in line with Reuters. 

China banned imports of the 737 Max after two crashes in 2018 and 2019 involving the Max 8. Chinese language airways solely began to fly the 737 Max in January 2023, nearly three years after the U.S. ended its grounding of the plane. 

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Boeing had additionally been just about shut out of the Chinese language market since 2017 due to rising U.S.-China commerce tensions. The U.S. planemaker not too long ago straight delivered a 787 Dreamliner to a Chinese language airline in December, signaling that the nation was beginning to heat as much as Boeing.  

Boeing declined to touch upon the supply. 

The China Southern Airways order is a uncommon bit of fine information for the 737 Max, which has come below scrutiny after a door panel blew off an Alaska Airways jet. The Federal Aviation Administration has grounded the Max 9 because of the Alaska incident. 

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Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun met with lawmakers in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday to handle current issues concerning the firm’s high quality management. 

“We don’t put planes within the air that we don’t have 100% confidence in,” Calhoun informed reporters, in line with The Guardian.

The CEOs of United Airways and Alaska each expressed frustration with the planemaker in televised interviews on Wednesday. 

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“I’m offended. This occurred to Alaska Airways,” Alaska CEO Ben Minicucci mentioned in an interview for NBC Information’ “Nightly Information With Lester Holt” on Tuesday. “It occurred to our friends and occurred to our folks.”

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